Royal Sussex County Hospital. Princes Royal Hospital. Hove Polyclinic. Sussex Universities



The Arrhythmia Nurse Specialist

What is an arrhythmia?
An arrhythmia is an abnormality of the heart’s rhythm, either caused by an inherited problem or by an acquired condition that disturbs the electrical impulses which regulate the heart.  The heart can beat too fast or too slow or in an irregular way.  Symptoms can include palpitations, loss of consciousness, dizziness, breathlessness, chest pain.
Cardiac arrhythmias are among the top ten reasons for hospital admission in the UK, affecting more than 700,000 people in England.  Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia, affecting 1% of the population rising to 4% of the over 65s and nearly 10% of the over 75s.

What is an arrhythmia nurse specialist?
There have been significant improvements in technology and clinical skills over recent years, improving prevention, diagnosis and treatment for patients with arrhythmias.  Many patients can be cured of troublesome or life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias, others can be treated, so improving quality of life and their chances of long-term survival.
The Arrhythmia Nurse acts as a dedicated point of contact and advocate for patients with heart rhythm problems. The main aim of the Arrhythmia Nurse is to provide support and information for patients presenting with arrhythmias, ensuring they receive timely assessment and diagnosis, effective treatment and rehabilitation for their condition. 
 

What patients are seen by the Arrhythmia Nurse?
The Arrhythmia Nurse sees patients presenting with new or troublesome atrial fibrillation (AF), patients with cardiomyopathies, ion channelopathies such as Long QT Syndrome and Brugada Syndrome.
The Arrhythmia Nurse is responsible in seeing adults with cardiac arrhythmias, in particular those patients undergoing electrophysiological studies (EPS), radiofrequency ablation (RFA), insertion of implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICD), cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT), permanent pacemakers (PPM) and implantable loop recorders (ILR) and other patients with arrhythmia’s that may benefit from further support/education and/or on going support once they are home.

How is the service delivered?
The arrhythmia nurse sees patients on an individual basis whilst in hospital and can offer information, both verbal and written, risk factor assessments, education of patients and carers, help with discharge planning, reassurance and ongoing help via telephone support.

Catherine Shannon

 


Catherine Shannon
Arrhythmia Nurse Specialist
Cardiac Rehabilitation Department,
The Royal Sussex County Hospital
Eastern Road,
Brighton,
BN2 5BE
e-mail: arrhythmia.nurses@bsuh.nhs.uk
Phone: 01273 696 955 Ext 7041

 

 

 


Helen Womersley
Arrhythmia Nurse Specialist
Cardiac Rehabilitation Department,
The Royal Sussex County Hospital
Eastern Road,
Brighton,
BN2 5BE
e-mail: arrhythmia.nurses@bsuh.nhs.uk
Phone: 01273 696 955 Ext 7041

 
image



image



image